Thousands cast ballots at Early Vote Center

More than 4,000 voters have already cast their ballots in Minneapolis elections. That’s 1,943 more than were accepted at this point in time during the last municipal election in 2013 – a difference of about 65 percent.

As of yesterday, Oct. 19, the City had accepted 4,012 ballots. Approximately 15 percent of those were mailed in. The rest came from in-person visits to the Early Vote Center, 217 S. Third St. Voters can vote early from now until the day before the Nov. 7 Election Day.

New hours for Early Vote Center

Voting early in Minneapolis is easy and convenient by mail or in person. With Election Day less than three weeks away, the Early Vote Center is expanding its hours of operation. Beginning Monday, Oct. 23, the center will be open weekdays from 7 a.m. to 6 p.m. The Early Vote Center will also have weekend hours for the final two weekends before Election Day:

  • Saturday, Oct. 28, 9 a.m. to 4 p.m.
  • Sunday, Oct. 29, 12 to 5 p.m.
  • Saturday, Nov. 4, 9 a.m. to 4 p.m.
  • Sunday, Nov. 5, 12 to 5 p.m.

To vote early by mail, voters may request an absentee ballot. Ballots are then mailed out, and they include everything a voter needs to send back a completed ballot. Visit vote.minneapolismn.gov/voters/absentee for absentee ballot applications in multiple languages that can be printed out and mailed, faxed or emailed in to request a ballot. Also online is a link to the Secretary of State’s absentee ballot lookup tool to follow the status of an absentee ballot that has been submitted. You can also watch this video on voting by mail for more information on how to fill out a ballot.

Sample ballots available online

Voters can see exactly what the ballot in their precinct looks like. Just go to vote.minneapolismn.gov/voters/ballot and a link there will take you to a Minnesota Secretary of State webpage where you can get your sample ballot. It’s a great way to make sure you’re prepared for the voting booth, and you can bring it with you to the polls as a reference.

In the mayor’s race, 16 candidates will appear on the ballot. All City Council offices will also be on the ballot. Each ballot across the city will also feature two other city-wide contests: one for two at-large seats on the Board of Estimate and Taxation, and one for three at-large seats on the Park and Recreation Board. Every voter will also have a chance to select a representative for one of the six Park and Recreation Board districts.

This election uses ranked-choice voting

Minneapolis voters will use ranked-choice voting this fall to elect a mayor and members of the City Council, Board of Estimate and Taxation, and Park and Recreation Board. Ranked-choice voting is a way of voting that eliminates the need for separate primary elections. Voters rank up to three candidates for each office. The ballot has three columns, and choices are made from left to right in those columns. Ranked-choice voting is used only for municipal elections in Minneapolis.

More information on ranked-choice voting is available at vote.minneapolismn.gov/rcv.

Get elections info at vote.minneapolismn.gov

The City has an elections-focused website: vote.minneapolismn.gov. This website is a central place to go for accurate, timely information about this year’s election and ranked-choice voting. The fresh, intuitive design is focused on the user, with content on the site arranged according to specific audiences including voters, candidates, volunteers and students.